The Ordinary skincare sale makes the prices look like typos

If you add up the cost of all the products in your skin-care #shelfie, you’d probably faint. That’s why when Deciem released it’s now cult-fave line The Ordinary—which offers products formulated with high-quality, luxury ingredients at a fraction of the price—everyone went wild. And now you can get an even better deal on everything on your wish list. Deciem believes that hyper-consumerism hurts the planet, and that flash sales don’t do customers any good because they lead to “rushed purchasing decisions, driven by the fear of a sell-out.” So rather than participating in Black Friday on November 29, the company’s website and retail stores shut down for the day. Instead, you’ll find an automatic 23-percent discount (no coupon code needed!) applied to every product until November 30 at 11:59pm ET. “We strongly believe that skincare decisions should be based on education rather than impulse, and hope that a month-long promotion will provide the time for research, reflection, and consideration,” the company wrote on Instagram. While The Ordinary’s products are already affordable, the sale prices look like straight-up typos. But we promise they’re not. Here are 8 must-have products t...

Sunshine Coast-based Terragen Holdings, which makes probiotic products for farmers, is looking to raise $20 million

Sunshine Coast-based Terragen Holdings, which makes probiotic products for farmers, is looking to raise $20 million in an initial public offering. A Sunshine Coast company that makes probiotic formulas for cows and soil is hoping to raise $20 million in an initial public offering. Terragen Holdings sells its Mylo live microbial cattle feed supplement to farmers in Australia and New Zealand that it says makes cattle heavier, healthier and stronger. The company also sells a soil conditioner called Great Land that’s produced under sterile fermentation conditions to produce high-quality bacteria useful for improving crop yield and health. “We’re using microbials to do a lot of the work that people for the last 50 years have used chemicals to do,” managing director Justus Hornburg told AAP. The bacteria is sourced from soil, plants and animals, then screened, tested and profiled in a laboratory and finally blended together at Terragen’s R&D facility in Coolum Eco Industrial Park. Terragen is also working to develop a teat conditioner to improve the udders of lactating production animals, as well as an anti-inflammatory product for dairy cattle and d...