It’s been about a year and a half since shareable e-scooters entered popular culture in earnest. Deployed en masse in San Francisco in the spring of 2018, scooters were immediately hailed as harbingers of a new micro-mobility revolution—or derided as a public safety menace and symbol of tech bro arrogance run amok, depending on who you asked. Today, in the U.S., policy concerning shareable e-scooters is as varied and inconsistent as public opinion. San Francisco banned them, then unbanned them, but in limited numbers and subject to permitting. Portland, Oregon, eventually allowed them as part of a pilot program. This past summer, New York State passed new and somewhat confusing legislation pertaining to e-bikes and e-scooters that legalizes both but specifically prohibits shared scooters in Manhattan, though in any case the bill remains unsigned by the governor, and so such conveyances remain in a state of legal limbo most effectively summed up with a *shrug* emoji.  For all the regional inconsistency regarding e-scooters, there’s one thing upon which most people seem to agree: they are dangerous. At least 11 people have died since the advent of the “e-scooter boom,” and there’s...